Doctor’s Corner


Lossman Eye Care of Illinois is dedicated to our customers, their eye health, and the preservation of their vision. To better inform our patients, some of the most common afflictions in the Eye Care industry are listed below.


Why Can’t I See?

Why Can’t I See?

Assuming the eye is healthy, refractive problems come from three locations. The curvature of the cornea may be too steep, too flat or irregular. The power of the lens may be incorrect. The length of the eye may be too long or too short. There are four basic types of refractive problems: MYOPIA (nearsightedness): The cornea may be too steep relative to the length of the eyeball. Effectively, the eye is too long. The visual image of light entering the eye focuses in front of the retina, resulting in a blurred or distorted view. HYPEROPIA (farsightedness): The cornea may be too flat relative to the length of the eyeball. Effectively, the eye is too short. The visual image of light entering the eye focuses behind the retina, resulting in a blurred or distorted view. ASTIGMATISM (asymmetrical cornea or lens): Unlike the normal eye that has a round shape, like a basketball, an eye with astigmatism has an oblong shaped eye, more like a football. The light rays entering the eye are unevenly bent, causing distortion and blurred vision. PRESBYOPIA: Presbyopia occurs when the eye’s near-focusing ability declines due to loss of elasticity of the fusing lens inside the eye. This generally occurs between ages of 35 and...

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Refractive Problems

Refractive Problems

MYOPIA (nearsightedness): The cornea may be too steep relative to the length of the eyeball. Effectively, the eye is too long. The visual image of light entering the eye focuses in front of the retina, resulting in a blurred or distorted view. HYPEROPIA (farsightedness): The cornea may be too flat relative to the length of the eyeball. Effectively, the eye is too short. The visual image of light entering the eye focuses behind the retina, resulting in a blurred or distorted view. ASTIGMATISM (asymmetrical cornea or lens); Unlike the normal eye that has a round shape, like a basketball, an eye with astigmatism has an oblong shaped eye, more like a football. The light rays entering the eye are unevenly bent, causing distortion and blurred vision. PRESBYOPIA: Presbyopia occurs when the eye’s near-focusing ability declines due to loss of elasticity of the fusing lens inside the eye. This generally occurs between ages of 35 and...

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Cataracts

Cataracts

A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens that causes loss of vision. The lens is located behind the iris and pupil. It focuses light onto the retina at the back of the eye. It adjusts to allow us to see clearly both up close and far away. The lens is made of mostly water and protein. As we age, this lens material begins to opacify. This is a cataract. This may worsen over time, making it difficult to see. Cataracts have little effect on vision at first. Vision may become a bit blured, like looking through a dirty window. You may also begin to notice glare from lights and say that colors seem to be faded. Cataracts are treated with surgery. The clouded lens is removed and most often replaced with a clear, plastic lens. This is usually an outpatient procedure. You will be instructed to use eye drops and an eye shield while sleeping while your eye heals. This procedure is very successful in restoring vision. Research is showing that there may be several contributors to cataract formation including smoking, diabetes, ultraviolet sunlight and normal aging changes of the...

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Glaucoma

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of diseases that can lead to damage to the eye’s optic nerve and result in blindness In many people, increased pressure inside the eye causes glaucoma. There is a space in the front of the eye called the anterior chamber. A clear fluid is continuously being produced and draining through this area. If this fluid is being produced too quickly or draining too slowly, the pressure in the eye will rise. If this is left uncontrolled, optic nerve damage and visual loss can result. Anyone can get glaucoma, but some people are at a higher risk than others. They include African-Americans over age 40, everyone over age 60 and people with a family history of glaucoma. Diabetics are also at greater risk for developing this disease. Glaucoma is not curable, but is controllable with treatment. Treatment varies with the type of glaucoma, but includes medications, laser surgery or conventional surgery. Our doctors comprehensive eye examinations including tonometry (the measure of the pressure inside the eye), a visual field analysis (the measure of your field of vision) and pupil dilation (which allows a better examination of the optic nerve) to determine your risk of developing glaucoma, further testing is completed and treatment is initiated as...

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Age-Related Macular Degenerations

Age-Related Macular Degenerations

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease that affects your central vision. Your macula is located in the center of the retina. It is the area of your retina that you use to “look” at objects. People with AMD rarely go blind from the disease, but it can make it difficult to read, drive, and do other activities that require clear straight-ahead vision. There are two types of age-related macular degeneration. The most common type is Dry AMD. The cause is unknown. The macular cells gradually begin to break down. As this occurs, you may start to lose central vision. This often initially occurs in just one eye. However, the disease may occur in the other eye later. Wet AMD is the second type of this disease. It is much more rare, but accounts for the majority of the blindness from the disease. Wet AMD occurs when new blood vessels in the retina start to grow toward the macula. They are very fragile and often leak blood and fluid under the macula. This causes macular damage and a rapid loss of central vision. The risk for developing AMD increases as you get older. Woman may be at higher risk than men. Smoking may increase the risk of AMD. People with a family history of AMD may be at higher risk, as are people with elevated levels of blood cholesterol. Dry AMD cannot be treated at this time. Fortunately, this form of the disease progresses very slowly. Eventually some central vision may be lost, but most people with dry AMD lead normal active lives. Some forms of wet AMD can be treated with laser surgery. The laser is used to stop the leaking blood vessels before further damage occurs. Our doctors of optometry perform through eye examinations to evaluated the health of you eyes and discuss your risk factors for developing this...

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Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels within the retina. The blood vessels may begin to swell and leak or new blood vessels may begin to grow on the surface of the retina. These changes may result in vision loss or blindness. The longer someone has diabetes, the greater his or her risk for developing diabetic eye disease. Almost 50% of all people with diabetes develop some diabetic retinopathy during their life There are often no symptoms during the early stages of the disease. There is no eye pain and vision isn’t blurred until the condition worsens. That is why it is so important to have an annual dilated examination if you have diabetes. Some diabetic retinopathy is treatable with the use of a laser. It is used to shrink the abnormal vessels growing in the retina. Studies have shown that this treatment reduces the risk of severe vision loss by 60%. It often cannot restore vision that has already been lost. That is why early detection is so important. Another complication related to diabetes is cataracts. People with diabetes are twice as likely to develop cataracts and often develop them earlier than people without diabetes. People with diabetes are also twice as likely to develop glaucoma as other adults. The longer you have diabetes, the greater the risk for developing glaucoma. Glaucoma related to diabetes is treated with medications, laser or surgery. If you are diabetic, we urge you to have annual dilated eye...

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Dry Eyes

Dry Eyes

Your eyes are lubricated by tears produce d by tear glands in you upper eyelid. Blinking spreads a film of tears across the surface of your eyes that then move to the inside area of your eye and drain through the tear drainage ducts in the nose and throat. Your tears are comprised of three separate layers. They include a watery layer, a mucus layer and an oily layer. An abnormality in any of these three layers can lead to dry eye symptoms. These symptoms include: Dryness of the eye mucous discharge Redness Sandy or gritty feeling Itching Burning Constant or occasional tearing Watery eyes Light sensitivity Eye pain or soreness Lid infections Sties Tired eyes Contact lens discomfort Contact lens solution sensitivity frequent use of lubricating eye drops   What causes dry eyes? Environment plays a large role in your tear layer. Sunny, dry or windy weather can lead to dry eye symptoms. Heaters, air conditioners and high altitudes increase the evaporation of tears from the eye’s surface. If your tear drainage is too great or too slight, you may experience dry eye symptoms. Wearing contact lenses increases tear evaporation and may lead to dry eye symptoms. Tear production gradually decreases with age. At age 65 the tear glands produce about 40% of the lubricating tears they produced at age 18. Certain medications, including decongestants, antihistamines and diuretics may reduce tear production. Other related conditions include sinus/nasal congestion, chronic cough, bronchitis, allergies or hay fever, middle ear congestion, dry throat or mouth, headaches and asthma.   How are dry eyes treated? Management of dry eyes can be a challenging process. Lubricating drops and ointments may provide relief for dry eyes. Lacrimal occlusion is often used when lubricating drops alone are not adequate. Lacrimal occlusion is the partial blockage of your tear drainage ducts to preserve natural tears on the surface of the eyes. This procedure often provides long-term relief from dry eye symptoms. Temporary (dissolving) plugs are inserted into your tear drainage ducts. They last four to seven days, during which time you symptoms are monitored. Once the efficacy of the plugs is determined, permanent plugs are inserted. Often lubricating drops are no longer needed following punctal occlusion. When left untreated, severely dry eyes may lead to chronic infection of you eye and eyelids, corneal ulceration, scarring and permanent vision loss. Our doctors of optometry will work with you to determine the best option for treating your dry eye...

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